Farming

Seeds of Gold holds farm clinic on goat rearing

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The main facilitator explains and shows the participants on one of the goats some of the aspects he covered during the theory session. PHOTOS BY MICHAEL KAKUMIRIZI 

By Carol Nambowa

Posted  Wednesday, June 18  2014 at  01:00

In Summary

We organised a day out on the farm for our readers to learn about goat farming. Carol Nambowa shares about how it went.

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The Seeds of Gold Farm Clinic held on June 14 at Katende Harembe Rural-Urban Training Centre is one to reckon as a success. Most participants were at Daily Monitor offices by 8am where they awaited transportation to the venue in Namugongo.
The number of people was over whelming and exceeded the earlier planned number, which was 100. As the deadline for registration approached, it was increased to 200 to accomodate the growing numbers of those interested. Even that was exceeded, as the eventual number came up to more than 300.
Once at the farm, a detailed presentation covering all aspects of goat rearing was given by Dr James Muwanga, a veterinary doctor. Mr Robert Ssemwogegere Katende, the farm’s proprietor, then shared his story with the audience with a message to utilise the available resources one has to start farming.
Monitor Publications’ Managing Director, Alex Asiimwe, gave a speech welcoming, thanking and encouraging participants to continue supporting the Seeds of Gold magazine. As though saving the best for last, the audience was treated to a knowledge-filled session from renowned goat breeder/farmer from Sembabule, Paul Ssembeguya.
As lunch was served, participants seized the opportunity for one-on-one engagements with Katende and Ssembeguya, and networking with others.
After lunch, they took a tour around the farm and were excited by the variety of crops, water harvesting techniques, goat breeds and other animals. Although focus was on goats, the best breeds, their products and how to start, they got to see fish farming, piggery, cattle rearing and different crops on the farm. Those who attended stayed until the close of the event at 5pm and none regretted the day spent at the farm.