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Workplace physical exercises

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By Mpiima Jamiru (Nutritionist-dietitian).

Posted  Saturday, February 15  2014 at  02:00

In Summary

Walk to work. If you move in a car, get off at an earlier stop than usual and walk the rest of the way. If you drive to work, park at the far end of the parking lot or at a nearby building. In your building, take the stairs rather than the elevator. Forget emailing or calling the person within the same building.

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Walk there.
Walk during your lunch break. If you find that boring, buy a camera and walk around taking pictures. You can buy a pedometer for monitoring.
Look for opportunities to stand. You will burn more calories standing than sitting. Stand while talking on the phone, for example.

Take fitness breaks. Rather than hanging out in the lounge with coffee or a snack, take a brisk walk or do some gentle stretching.

Conduct meetings on the go. When it is practical, schedule walking meetings or walking brainstorming sessions. Do laps inside your building or, if the weather allows, take your walking meetings outdoors.

Desk pushups can be a good strengthener. (First, make sure your desk is solid enough to support your weight.) Standing, put your hands on the desk. Walk backward, then do push-ups against the desk. Repeat 15 times.

Stretch. Move your legs while waiting for a web page to load, the copier to spit out your reports, or faxes to slither out. Sitting tall in your chair, stretch both arms over your head and reach for the sky. After 10 seconds, extend the right hand higher, then the left. Let your head roll over so that your right ear nearly touches your right shoulder. Using your hand, press your head a little lower (gently). Hold for 10 seconds. Relax, and then repeat this on the other side.

Take note. Put a reminder on your phone, desk calendar or a sticky note on your computer to take your exercise breaks.
Do not let fear of embarrassment keep you from exercising at work. Chances are, your co-workers will admire your efforts rather than be amused. You might even get them to join you on a lunchtime walk or to help you lobby for lunch-hour exercise classes at your workplace.
A normal adult is supposed to have at least 150 minutes ( 30 minutes every five days) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity such as fast walking, therefore, make every minute count.