Healthy Living

Managing it: Tonsillitis

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By Emmy Omongin

Posted  Monday, February 17  2014 at  02:00
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According to webmd.com, tonsils are located at the back of the throat and act as germ filters. However, when they get infected and overwhelmed by bacteria or viruses, they swell and become inflamed, a condition known as tonsillitis. It causes a sore throat and cold-like symptoms such as runny nose, nasal congestion, sneezing, and coughing.
According to Anthony Ayebale, a doctor at Gaba Medical Centre, here are some of the things that may help you or your child feel better:

• Drinking warm or cool liquids. These include tea, soup, juice, and rehydration drinks.
•Eating frozen desserts.
• Getting plenty of rest.
• Gargling with warm salt water several times a day. You can make your own salt water by mixing 1 tea spoon of salt to 240 ml of water.
He says: “Cough and cold medicines may not be safe for young children or people who have certain health problems. Before you use these medicines, check the label. Antiseptic mouthwashes, decongestants, and antihistamines have not been proved effective for tonsillitis and may result in harmful side effects,” she says.

He adds that a sore throat along with sudden fever and swollen lymph nodes, and without symptoms of an upper respiratory tract infection, may point to a bacterial infection. “Anyone with these symptoms should see a doctor to be tested for strep throat, which requires treatment with antibiotics,” he says, adding: “It is important to get plenty of rest. Take all the prescribed antibiotics exactly as directed. Keep your child home from school for the first one to two days of antibiotic treatment. He or she is still contagious during this time and might pass the infection to others.”