Tuesday March 6 2018

Every time I have an allergy, I get hiccups, why?

hiccup

You, therefore, need to stop taking these steroids without prescription and see whether an allergy without drugs will lead to a hiccup or not. Courtesy photo 

By Dr Vincent Karuhanga

A hiccup happens when there is a sudden contraction (spasm) of a big flat muscle that separates the chest from the abdomen (diaphragm) resulting in a gust of air that is taken in only to be stopped by a sudden closure of the vocal cords, which then makes the characteristic “hiccup” sound.

Though in many cases the hiccup comes without a known cause and goes away after a short time on its own, a full stomach due to eating or drinking too quickly, swallowing lots of air, smoking, emotional stress or excitement may all be implicated.

Drugs called steroids (prednisone, Dexamethasone) given for an allergy, can also send one hiccupping and could be the reason you hiccup when you have an allergy attack.

You, therefore, need to stop taking these steroids without prescription and see whether an allergy without drugs will lead to a hiccup or not.

Breathing into a bag to increase carbondioxide intake, taking or putting iced water at the nape of the neck and counting while holding your breath are some of the first aid tricks that you can adopt. Failure of these calls for a visit to a health worker.

How to prevent allergies
Change environment. Ask your doctor how to minimise exposure to substances that prompt your flare-ups. Keeping pets out of certain rooms, covering your mattress, or running the air conditioner to filter out pollens are some commonly used and effective allergy countermeasures.

Find allergy triggers. Note all the details surrounding your allergy flare-ups: where you are, what you’ve been doing, what time of day and year it is. Then report them to your doctor, telling her exactly how the symptoms feel.
Source: www.prevention.com

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