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Man held over acid attack on top city pastor

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By STEPHEN OTAGE & ANDREW BAGALA

Posted  Tuesday, December 27   2011 at  00:00
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The police in Kampala are holding a man in connection wiht a Christmas Eve acid attack on Pastor Umar Mulinde.
Apostle Mulinde, who denounced Islam after he became a born-again Christian, was left with a damaged right eye and a disfigured face on Christmas Eve after an assailant splashed acid on his face at Namasuba, a Kampala suburb.

Police say the suspect is in their custody but they would not reveal his identity because the case is still at a sensitive stage. “One person has been arrested and he is helping us with the investigations,” the police spokesman, Mr Asuman Mugenyi, said.

Gospel Life Church leader Apostle Mulinde, who is currently admitted to International Hospital Kampala, attracted many followers after he converted from Islam and became a strong critic of the teachings of Prophet Muhammad.
He told Daily Monitor yesterday from his hospital bed that he believes that the attack that happened around 9pm at his church had connections to his preaching and interpretation of the Quran.

Targeted
“I have been witch-hunted since I converted to Christianity. I do not know which crime I committed because I have been receiving threats and the authorities kept ignoring them not knowing it would result into this,” Apostle Mulinde said.
He said as he was leaving his church, a person who claimed to be one of his flock called him aside pretending that he was wanted. He obliged. “When I turned around, the assailant poured acid on my face which splashed on the right side of the face, suit and shirt affecting my eye and face,” Apostle Mulinde said.

He added that shortly after the incident, he heard one of the assailants shouting ‘Allah Akbar’ (God is Great).
Mr Mugenyi yesterday said they have not yet reached a conclusion that the attack was religiously motivated. Religious motivated violence have been rare in Uganda in recent history.

The attacks have mainly been common in domestic related violence or over personal and business rivalries.

editorial@ug.nationmedia.com