Father blames police over Kirumira killing

Mr Kawooya says his son confided in his relatives that his death was imminent but never named the mastermind.

Mr Abubaker Kawooya during the interview yestersday. PHOTO BY JAMES KABENGWA 

BY JAMES KABENGWA

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Kampala- The father of slain officer, Mohammad Kirumira, has blamed his death on police that he said failed to secure his son who provided them specific information on criminals within their ranks.
In an interview yesterday, Mr Abubaker Kawooya questioned the Force’s witness protection policy, arguing that individuals who volunteer “sensitive information” should not be left to die on their own.

“After providing such sensitive information on criminals, police should have provided him (Kirumira) with protection [as one of] its officers,” Mr Kawooya said, adding: “And this must be a standard procedure not limited to police officers, but the general community who divulge information about criminal activities”.

Police last night declined to respond to the accusations.
“I have not heard that from mzee (Kirumira’s father). I would rather not respond to rumours,” said Police spokesman Emilian Kayima.
Kirumira, a former Buyende District police commander, who made a name as an inside critic of police, was intercepted and brutally shot dead in Bulenga in Wakiso District last Saturday.

Prior to his death, he had in information posted on his social media sites, shared with police and Uganda Human Rights Commission alerted authorities and friends that his life was in danger. He also confided in his relatives that his death was imminent but never named the mastermind, his father said yesterday.

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Asked whether he believes police know the killers, Mr Kawooya retorted: “I don’t believe police know the killers of my son. I think if police knew them, it should have arrested them long ago. These killers seem to be a gang of organised criminals terrorising people.” Responding to the concerns that police failed to safeguard the late Kirumira, deputy police spokesperson Patrick Onyango said: “We have lost a police officer. We are still mourning. There is no need for us to exchange words.”
Below are the excerpts

What did you make of your son’s run-ins with police supervisors?
The President told us already that a hammer can only be confronted by a hammer. What would he (Kirumira) have done? Would he just look on? No way- a hammer is matched [with] a hammer. If there were clear accusations [against my son], not these cases of stealing rolex, I would say: it’s ok. But bogus cases like they were, any parent would get irritated!
Your son repeatedly warned of threats against him. Whom did he tell you was the mastermind?
He pointed no fingers at anyone, he never named anyone. But he knew and we all knew he would be killed. He had already been placed on that list like (the former police spokesperson late Andrew Felix) Kaweesi. Many others including Kaweesi are already assassinated. So it was now his turn, he was on that list.
Do you think police know Kirumira killers?
I don’t believe police knows the killers of my son. I think if police knew them, it should have arrested them long ago. These killers seem to be a gang of organised criminals terrorising people”
What is your message to police?
“After providing such sensitive information on criminals, police should have provided him with protection to its officer (Kirumira). And this must be a standard procedure not limited to police officers, but entirely the general community who divulge information about criminal activities”.
What counsel did you give your son after the altercations with his seniors in police became public?
My son has always stood for the truth. I believe in the truth.
What do you think was the gist of this fight?
Telling the truth.
You said at the burial that your son died for speaking out the truth. Can you elaborate?
Kirumira was “mwoyo gwa gwanga” (patriotic). What you heard him say it was not because he enjoyed to say it, but what he said was what he knew and those he talked about are those in detention today. No big deal that some were bailed out.
Who are those?
The ones in detention. Others released I will name them some time.
What type of person was Kirumira as a son because his employer appeared to struggle in managing him as an officer?

Since childhood Kirumira was obedient and good helper to others, respectful to seniors. The problem people didn’t want to be told realities.

When did you last speak to him and what was the conversation about?
On (last) Thursday I had paid a visit and he escorted me to the stage. We discussed home issues.

editorial@ug.nationmedia.com

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