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Police mass wedding suspended over funds

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By ANDREW BAGALA

Posted  Thursday, July 24   2014 at  12:59
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KAMPALA.
Police have suspended a mass wedding they were organising for their officers after failing to find funds.

At least 50 officers at Nsambya and Naguru barracks had already registered to be wed with their partners in a mass wedding.

Police unit commanders outside Kampala had also received thrice that number registered in Kampala. The mass wedding was slated for September in Kampala.

Mr Fred Enanga, the police spokesman, said they wanted to use the budget of the centenary celebrations to organise a wedding for their officer but funds may not allow.

“These event needed a lot of funds since it involved officers all over the country. We have temporarily suspended the mass wedding because we couldn’t find funds in the centenary celebration budget but if we get funds, we shall organise it,” Mr Enanga said yesterday.

The idea of having a police mass wedding was started by Nsambya Catholic Church priest who saw several of his police flocks unmarried because they didn’t have funds to organise weddings.

At least 40,000 officers are below the rank of Assistant Superintendent of Police with the highest paid among them getting Shs5m which is half of the budget of an average wedding.

The priest asked the officers to have a mass wedding, the idea that was sold to the Inspector General of Police, Gen. Kale Kayihura, who approved it.

However, Mr Moses Otala, the coordinator of police mass wedding, wasn’t aware of the new developments.

Mr Otala said their studies have shown that married officers work better in field than their unmarried or cohabiting colleagues.
“We expect the wedding to be held in September to early October this year as we celebrate police’s centenary,” Mr Otala said.

The nature of police work that involves constant movements makes them susceptible to having multiple partners, which puts them at the risk of catching HIV.

The Police HIV/Aids prevalence rate is at 12 per cent higher than the national rate of 7.3 per cent.