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Police most corrupt JLOS institution - study

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By BETTY NDAGIRE

Posted  Friday, January 11   2013 at  02:00

In Summary

The researchers carried out household survey, private enterprises survey and the public officials’ survey. JLOS institutions.

Ministry of Justice and Constitutional Affairs, Ministry of Internal Affairs, Judiciary, Uganda Police Force, Uganda Prison Service, Directorate of Public Prosecutions, Judicial Service Commission, Ministry of Local Government, Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development (Probation and Juvenile Justice), Uganda Law Reform Commission, Uganda Human Rights Commission, Law Development Centre, Tax Appeals Tribunal, Uganda Law Society, Centre for Arbitration and Dispute Resolution and Uganda Registration Services Bureau.

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The Uganda Police Force is the most corrupt of all the 15 institutions in the Justice Law and Order Sector (JLOS), a new report has said.

According to the report by JLOS, five in every 10 respondents said police officers had asked them for bribes, the most prevalent form of corruption.

When contacted for a comment on the report, the deputy police spokesperson, Mr Vicent Ssekatte, said he was attending a meeting, while his senior, Ms Judith Nabakooba, is on leave.

The report, a baseline survey report on selected JLOS indicators released in Kampala on Wednesday, states that corruption prevents the poor and marginalised citizens from accessing services and from claiming their rights.

Dr Yovani Lubaale, a quantitative data analyst, said due to public perception that the police is the most corrupt institution, fewer people report cases to them.

“Although Police has made the masses aware of its existence in the recent years by extending its services nearer to the people, many said they [have] lost trust in it [police] because you need to offer bribes in order to be attended to,” said Dr Lubaale.
Some 5,376 households in 56 districts participated in the study whose objectives were to enhance access to justice, the rule of law and to promote the observance of human rights and accountability.

The report also fingered the judiciary, the immigration department, the Administrator General and Trustees Chambers and the Uganda Registration Services Bureau (URSB), among others.
Some 16.4 per cent of the respondents said they had been asked by officials of the judiciary for bribes compared with the 10.3 per cent (immigration), 9.9 per cent (administrator general and trustees chambers) and 5.4 per cent (URSB).

While launching the report, Chief Justice Benjamin Odoki said there is need for JLOS to seek ways of making the masses understand how each of its institutions work.

“The fact that only 50 per cent of the respondents in the survey knew about Courts of Judicature shows that there is need to create awareness about this institutions,” Justice Odoki said.

bndagire@ug.nationmedia.com