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Ebola deaths pass 300 in West Africa

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World Health Organisation officials in protective clothing preparing to enter Kagadi Hospital in Kibale District, Uganda where an outbreak of Ebola virus started in July 28 2012. PHOTO BY AGENCIES.

World Health Organisation officials in protective clothing preparing to enter Kagadi Hospital in Kibale District, Uganda where an outbreak of Ebola virus started in July 28 2012. PHOTO BY AGENCIES. 

By Agencies

Posted  Friday, June 20  2014 at  01:00

In Summary

More than 500 suspected or confirmed cases of the virus have been recorded, the WHO says.

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Conakry- The number of people killed by the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa has risen to 337, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has said.

Fourteen deaths and 47 new cases were reported across the region over the last week, it added.

Guinea is worst-affected with 264 Ebola-related deaths. In Sierra Leone, there have been 49 deaths and in Liberia 24, the WHO said.

The three countries have been battling to contain the outbreak since February.

The outbreak began in southern Guinea’s Guekedou region, but then spread to its neighbours.

More than 500 suspected or confirmed cases of the virus have been recorded, the WHO said.
There is no cure or vaccine for Ebola - one of the world’s deadliest viruses.

It is spread by close contact and kills between 25 per cent and 90 per cent of those infected, depending on the strain of the virus, according to the WHO.
Symptoms include internal and external bleeding, diarrhoea and vomiting.

On Tuesday, Liberia reported the first Ebola-related deaths in its capital city, Monrovia.

Seven people have died there, including a baby and a woman who had come from Sierra Leone, health officials said.

This is the first time an Ebola outbreak has hit multiple locations in three countries.

The people who inhabit the region where Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone meet are from the Kissy ethnic group and they cross the often unmarked borders freely, to farm and trade.

So maintaining medical controls is a real challenge, according to analysts.