Editorial

There’s need to tighten security

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Posted  Monday, December 9  2013 at  00:00
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Ugandans have in the recent past fallen victim to sex offenders who enter the country on the pretext of business as investors, tourists or humanitarians. In 2012, Emin Baro, a tourist of Macedonian origin, pleaded guilty to accusations of molesting girls and possessing child pornography.

In June, the police issued a notice saying the Special Investigations Unit probed a case of alleged aggravated defilement and trafficking of children where Mr Yang Zhengjun a Chinese national allegedly trafficked two girls aged nine and 13 from Gulu to Kampala for sexual exploitation. He has since gone missing after skipping bail but is still charged with aggravated defilement and trafficking of children.

In July, a case of a 23-year-old woman who was gang-raped and sodomised by five men came to light. The Pakistani nationals were working with a car importer in Kampala. Two of the suspects were arrested, charged in court and remanded to Luzira prion but the others are still at large.

And most recently, a German national who was taking care of children in Kalangala District was accused of allegedly defiling 34 girls in his custody.

The suspect has not yet been found guilty and is, therefore, innocent until the court proves otherwise.

This is not to insinuate that all foreigners in the country have sinister motives but to ask the question; how serious are the authorities in monitoring activities of foreigners in country? In one of the above cases it was reported that a senior security personnel shelved the case after being allegedly bribed by the suspects. Are the police really doing their best in apprehending the perpetrators? Before anyone, foreigner or Ugandan citizen sets up a humanitarian organisation or business, how often and thoroughly are they monitored?

Sexual crime has no race or nationality. Everyday cases of rape and defilement perpetuated by Ugandans are reported. Dealing with local cases is already too much for the police without adding a bulk of foreign criminals. Let’s tighten our policing both by authorities and the community. Otherwise, cases such as these will continue to go on unabated.

editorial@ug.nationmedia.com