Religious leaders begin preaching fertility awareness

Friday July 6 2018

Lauren Vanenk the programs officer at the

Lauren Vanenk the programs officer at the Institute of Reproductive Health explained that by educating the public about fertility, families will be encouraged to use natural methods to plan and have manageable families. This does not require money to access the services. PHOTO BY STEPHEN OTAGE 

By Stephen Otage

The Muslim, Catholic and Protestant Medical bureaus, have launched a campaign to begin teaching their followers the values of planning for their families.

While launching the campaign yesterday, Dr John Baptist Kauta, the Secretary General Uganda Episcopal Conference, dispelled the belief that the Catholic Church is against family planning and its methods, explaining that instead the Catholic Church promotes it because it means a good quality of life and society.

“The Catholic Church is not against family planning and its methods. It is good to plan for families by spacing children such that they can be manageable. That is why we are integrating fertility awareness in all the things we do,” he said.

The Uganda Episcopal Conference, is the apex body that speaks on behalf of all Catholic Bishops.

According to Dr Sam Oriochi Orach, the executive director Uganda Catholic Medical Bureau, the project which was launched yesterday, was an initiative between the Catholic Medical Bureau and the protestant medical bureau but also benefited the Muslims who will use medical facilities where their followers usually go to get services, to educate them about the importance of fertility.

“We are not against family planning but the use of contraceptives. This is bigger than the comprehensive sexual education you are talking about. It involves domestic violence, the family size and harmony of the family among others,” he said.

Lauren Vanenk the programs officer at the Institute of Reproductive Health explained that by educating the public about fertility, families will be encouraged to use natural methods to plan and have manageable families. This does not require money to access the services.

Dr Diana Atwine, the Permanent Secretary Ministry of Health, said Ugandans especially those in rural areas have lost the sense of responsibility by producing children anyhow and as a result, they are pressuring government to provide basic services like feeding their children, educating them, clothing them and it is the reason why cries for government help are becoming rampant.

“You are asking government to pay tuition for your children, feed them, educate them as if it is government who produced them,” she said, adding that there is need to have men educated about fertility because most times they demand for sex without knowing its implications.

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