UPDF to train police recruits in military tactics

Tuesday October 15 2019

Screening. Applicants seeking to join the

Screening. Applicants seeking to join the Uganda Police Force undergo drills at Kibuli Police Children School in Kampala on January 27, 2015. PHOTO BY ABUBAKER LUBOWA 

By URN

Over 5000 new police recruits are receiving three months military training to equip them with skills in handling paramilitary situations.

According to police spokesperson Mr Fred Enanga, the military training is meant to prepare the new recruits ahead of tough times that usually come abruptly and also accomplish tasks in hard to reach areas like Karamoja, the mountainous and swampy areas.

Enanga was clarifying on the matter that there has been heavy deployment of military personnel at the Kabalye Police Training School in Masindi district.

He dismissed reports going round that the school had been taken over by the military.

Enanga said the army officers were invited to conduct military training for the recently recruited 4500 Probation Police Constables (PPCs) and 500 Learner Assistant Inspector of Police (LAIPs).

According to Enanga, the two groups started their 12 months course on September 14 and have since been majorly undergoing intensive scrutiny exercise intended to test their mental and physical eligibility.

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“Why we take our officers through the military approach is that the training helps improve their skills especially when handling paramilitary situations. These days you have seen that there is much violence in the community and there is increase in population which requires our officers to have these skills to counter any situation,” he said.

After the 12 weeks of the military course, recruits will now be subjected to police training which will basically rotate around police and the law, crowd control, investigations, crime scene management and responses to security alerts.

Enanga said that more than 800 trainers have been prepared to ensure the 5,000 recruits receive the necessary skills in their one year of training.

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