Be on top of things: Negligence is costly

Saturday May 16 2020

 

By Ethan Musolini

One time, I checked in my post office box and noticed a communication that I had some letters to pick.

However, it was late in the evening and as such, most offices were closed. I promised myself that I would go there in the near future to pick the letters. The near future turned into weeks and months.

Finally, I decided to pick what belonged to me. It was registered mail. I discovered that they were two dividend cheques. But there was one problem. They had been lying there for six months and they expired.

If you receive a cheque and it is not deposited within six months, it becomes null and void. That’s what happened to me. Just like that, I missed out on some big money that would have put a smile on my face. This is what I call negligence.
In the recent past, someone I know got his bank account hacked into and a substantial amount was transferred to another person’s account.

Upon noticing the move, he called someone in the bank early morning and requested that the culprit’s bank account should have a caveat effected such that no money is withdrawn.

This would also facilitate the bank to catch the aforementioned person. No immediate action was taken and money was physically withdrawn one and a half hours later. It’s called negligence of duty.

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The key to note in both scenarios is how costly negligence can be. When we do not pay attention to what we are supposed to do on time, it costs us in the long run.

My coach emphasises the need to take care of business and being on top of things.Your challenge is three-fold. Pay attention. Take care of things. Always be on top of things.

Ethan Musolini is the CEO of Success Africa, motivational speaker, HR consultant and success coach. Ethan.musolini@gmail.com

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