Experts urge govt to work on e-mobility laws

In June, the Ministry of Energy in partnership with GIZ Uganda Energy and Climate Programme launched a new e-mobility station in Mpigi District. Photo | file

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Previously, government has indicated that Uganda now has 28 e-mobility charging stations with some already established in the Kampala-Masaka e-mobility corridor

Experts have said government should put in place guidelines to regulate establishment of electric charging stations. 

Speaking during a consultative meeting to discuss the possibility of setting up a scalable Electric Vehicle Charging Ecosystem in Uganda, Mr Roland Ferwerda, a consultant a NTCS GreenBee, a Dutch consulting firm, said the issue of regulation around chargers is important given that it provides trust, stability and allows long term investors and users to easily navigate the space. 

Previously, government has indicated that Uganda now has 28 e-mobility charging stations with some already established in Mpigi District, which is part of the Kampala-Masaka e-mobility corridor.  In June, government launched the fourth electric motorcycle charging stations along Kampala-Masaka Road.

Mr Ferwerda said e-mobility across the globe continues to be an innovative space, which can as well work in Uganda due to presence of a lot of sustainable energy. 

In Uganda, whereas use of electric vehicles is still alien, in July President Museveni said Ugandans must embrace e-mobility as an alternative and a long-term solution to challenges of escalating fuel prices. 

Ms Thatcher Mpanga Nakimuli, the Kiira Motors product design manager, said they are currently pushing government to fast-truck establishing of proper standards and regulations to guide innovators in the e-mobility sector, noting that it is important for stakeholders to understand what is required before they can invest. 

She also noted that there was need for a well-planned network of charging stations with sufficient energy to boost the shift from fuel to electric vehicles. 

On his part, Eng David Birimumaso, the Ministry of Energy assistant commissioner energy efficiency and conservation, said by 2030, at least 25 per cent of government’s fleet is electric vehicles, noting that they are putting together a number of policy measures, among which include tariff guides.

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