Ways an introvert-extrovert relationship can work

Thursday March 25 2021
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By Bradford Kamuntu

An introvert is someone who tends to self-reflect and is more interested in one’s own mental self, unlike the extrovert who primarily obtain gratification from others.

Different as they may be, introverts and extroverts often end up in romantic partnerships, partnerships that last and work out very well for them. It could possibly be a case of opposites attracting where the two polar personalities balance each other out.

The fundamental difference between them is that one requires alone time to recharge while the other gains energy by being around other people. Oddly, I am somewhere in between so I would thrive with either.

There are great perks to dating an extrovert. They generally take charge in situations that require one to be social. They are a human buffer and are someone to always lean on in social settings.

I enjoy watching couples that are complete opposites, watching how the introvert leans on the extrovert for support in social settings and how the introvert gets the other in order when they are doing a little too much in public.

It is easy to assume that the opposing personalities could have a negative impact on a relationship, but I think it is quite the opposite. There needs to be a balancing act in all relationships. You cannot have too much of the same, the two need different qualities and personalities help to create a well-balanced relationship.

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What needs to be navigated and explored is how the different personalities handle and deal with their emotions. Extroverts tend to be vocal and confrontational and more inclined to address their emotions in the moment whereas the same cannot be said for introverts. These tend to generally keep a lid on their emotions and have to be prompted to speak up about their feelings. A space must be cultivated where the introvert feels they can freely and openly come to the extrovert regularly.

Compromise comes in handy when dealing with conflicting personalities. If one party desires to have some alone time whereas the other needs a fix of human interaction, then it is perhaps prudent to honour that and make provision for both in your shared schedule on a regular basis.

Find activities to do together to keep your relationship fun and exciting without having to leave your comfort zone entirely. Compromise ensures that you both get the best of both worlds whilst enjoying each other.

Understand each other’s needs and make sure they are met in the most respectful manner without trying to change the other person.

Possible. In spite of their differences, introverts and extroverts make great romantic partners. Perhaps it is a case of opposites attracting. What one partner lacks, the other more than makes up for.?

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