Kenya fuel crisis won’t affect Uganda, says govt

Motorists queue for fuel at Total fuel station in Kapenguria, West Pokot county on April 5, 2022. PHOTO/NMG

What you need to know:

  • On Monday, Kenya President Uhuru Kenyatta signed a Bill in which a supplementary budget (Shs1 trillion) would be allocated for a fuel stabilisation programme aimed at cushioning the high cost of fuel.

Government officials have allayed fears that the fuel shortage witnessed in Kenya will affect the supply of products to Uganda.

The spokesman of the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development, Mr Solomon Muyita, said the fuel supply to Uganda is still open and the petroleum companies are getting stock they booked for.

“Uganda gets its fuel from international companies and the products are available though at higher prices. We are receiving the stock that we ordered. The Kenya fuel crisis will not affect us,” Mr Muyita said yesterday. 

“The shortage of fuel in Kenya is due to internal issues related to giving subsidies and fixing of fuel prices by Kenyan government. The Kenyan government hadn’t paid their fuel companies funds for subsidies in time and in turn they (companies) didn’t order enough stock for their economy.”

Motorists in Kenya are experiencing shortage of fuel at the petrol stations in all parts of the country.

There are fears that fuel shortage will affect transporters, who ferry cargo to and from Mombasa Port in Kenya.

Uganda also imports several goods and food from Kenya.

On March 14, Kenya Transporters Association, which is the major transporter of Ugandan cargo, warned that their members would increase the transport rates by five percent after a rise in the prices of fuel in Kenya.

“Kenya Transporters Association wishes to advice transporters countrywide to increase their transport rates by a minimum of five percent to sustain their businesses under the current circumstances and to circumvent a total collapse of their businesses,” said Mr Newton Wang’oo, the chairman of Kenya Transporters Association.

According to experts, increase in the prices of fuel in Kenya will automatically affect the transportation of products in Uganda. Earlier, Mr William Busuulwa, the chairperson of the Uganda National Transport Alliance, said the fuel crisis in Kenya affects the truck drivers because they have to refuel on the way.
“Truck drivers travelling to or from Mombasa to pick or deliver goods have to fuel either in Uganda or Kenya because of the long journey,” Mr Busuulwa said.

On Monday, Kenya President Uhuru Kenyatta signed a Bill in which a supplementary budget (Shs1 trillion) would be allocated for a fuel stabilisation programme aimed at cushioning the high cost of fuel.

Welcome!

You're all set to enjoy unlimited Prime content.