Muslims mark Eid-Ul-Adhuha with call against corruption

Muslims attend Eid-Ul-Adhuha prayer at Gulu Public Primary School in Gulu City on June 16. Photo | EMMY DANIEL OJARA

What you need to know:

  • Sheikh Muzamil Ismael Mandela, Khadi of the Acholi Muslim District, stressed the importance of peace, forgiveness, and tolerance in community development.

On Sunday, Muslims in various places gathered to celebrate Eid-Ul-Adhuha celebrations also known as the "Feast of Sacrifice," commemorate Prophet Ibrahim's test of faith.

In Acholi, Muslims gathered at Gulu Public Primary School where they conveyed a powerful message against corruption and embezzlement.

Under the leadership of Jamiah Mosque, the community came together to condemn the misuse of public funds and call for a more equitable society.

Sheikh Mahmood Ali, County Sheikh of Gulu and Omoro, emphasised that corruption affects everyone, particularly the grassroots population who are denied basic needs.

"We must remember that corruption hurts us all, from the top to the bottom. We have people who can't afford a meal or a decent dress. We must think about them," he said.

Sheikh Mahmood continued: "Wealth amassed through corruption is fleeting. We will all die and leave everything behind. Let us live a life equivalent to those around us and share with others."

Sheikh Muzamil Ismael Mandela, Khadi of the Acholi Muslim District, stressed the importance of peace, forgiveness, and tolerance in community development.

"Forgiveness and tolerance are essential in every aspect of life, from families to workplaces," he said.

The clerics also warned against alcoholism and indecency, urging the faithful to celebrate Eid-Ul-Adhuha in accordance with Sharia law.

"’We call upon all Muslims to celebrate per the Sharia (law), there is no disco, there is no going for alcohol, there is nothing other than worshiping and sacrificing and sharing with friends, families and the neighbours," Sheikh Mahmood said.

As the community gathered at Jamiah Mosque, at least 25 cattle were prepared for slaughter, symbolizing the spirit of sharing and generosity that defines Eid-Ul-Adhuha.