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Govt to honour first police chief Oryema

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Police chief Kale Kayihura pays homage to the late Oryema at his grave in Nwoya District last Friday. PHOTO BY JULIUS OCUNGI 

By Julius Ocungi

Posted  Monday, August 11   2014 at  01:00

In Summary

Recognition. Gen Kayihura notes that Oryema was among the fallen top police officers whose history is worthy being kept in a museum

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NWOYA.
The government is set to build a museum and a mausoleum in honour of Uganda’s first Police Commissioner, Erinayo Wilson Oryema. This was revealed by the Inspector General of Police, Gen Kale Kayihura.

Oryema was appointed the first African commissioner on April 17, 1964 by then Prime Minister, Dr Apollo Milton Obote.

He was killed by president Idi Amin’s government operatives in February 1977 together with Archbishop Janan Luwum and Defence minister Oboth Ofumbi.

Gen Kayihura made the revelation when he paid a courtesy visit to Oryema’s family at Tangi village, Purongo Sub-county in Nwoya District last Friday.

“We thought of honouring our fallen police heroes who lost their lives while serving this country. He was brutality murdered and he paid his ultimate price in serving the country,” Gen Kayihura said.

“He served this country diligently but at the time of his burial, he was not accorded decent burial,” he added. Gen Kayihura said the government will also arrange for a decent state reburial ceremony for the ex-police chief on September 20.

“The museum will help in keeping the history of our prominent police officers since in all the past years, no fountain of honour in form of monument or museum has been made for their services,” Gen Kayihura said.

He said the proposal had come at a time when the Force is celebrating 100 years.

“This is the time that we need to erect something that will keep next generation aware of our heroes not just in books,” the police chief said.

Gen Kayihura said a national police museum will also be constructed at Kibuli Police Training School.
Ms Getrude Auma, the deceased’s eldest daughter, applauded the plan to honour her father. “This is the moment we have been waiting for,” Ms Auma said.

who was Oryema?
Born in 1917, Oryema worked as a teacher before joining the police force in March 1939. He succeeded Michael Macoun who became an adviser to the Ugandan government before leaving for Britain. Oryema also served as Minister of Lands between 1971 and 1974 before moving to the Land, Housing and Physical Planning ministry where he served until he died.