Former Prime Minister Apolo Nsibambi dies

Tuesday May 28 2019

Prof Apolo Nsibambi

Prof Apolo Nsibambi  

By Monitor Reporter

Former Prime Minister Prof Apolo Robin Nsibambi has died.
Ms Julie Nsibambi, his daughter, confirmed the demise of Nsibambi on social media.

According to Mr Moses Kasibante, the Rubaga North Member of Parliament,  Prof Nsibambi has been battling cancer.

Quoting Prof Nsibambi’s wife, Esther Nsimbabi, Mr Kasibante said the former prime minister passed on  decently and peacefully at his home on Tuesday evening.

Mr Kasibante said the nation has lost a nationalist.

"I learnt from him that retirement doesn't mean the end of life," Mr Kasibante said.

He described him as a man who was an example to leaders who don't want to retire.

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President Yoweri Museveni, in a tweet, described Prof Nsimbambi as a true patriot and great academic.

“The country will miss him. I have instructed Prime Minister Ruhakana Rugunda to lead a team that will ensure we give Prof Nsibambi a befitting send-off,” Mr Museveni said via @KagutaMuseveni

Prof Nsibambi, 78, an academic and politician was Prime Minister from April 1999 to May 2011, when Mr Patrick Amama Mbabazi succeeded him.
He studied at King’s College Budo, Makerere University, the University of Chicago, University of Nairobi, and the University of London.
In the 60s he taught at Makerere University and thereafter served as the Dean of Faculty of Social Sciences from 1978 until 1983 and from 1985 until 1987.
He was appointed Head of the Department of Political Science at Makerere University in 1987, a position he held until 1990. He was Director of the Makerere Institute of Social Research (MISR) from 1994 to 1996.
Between 1996 and 1998, he served as Minister of Public Service in the Uganda Cabinet. In 1998 he was appointed Minister of Education and Sports, serving in that capacity until 1999 when he was appointed Prime Minister and Leader of Government Business.
Prof Nsibambi was the first non-Head-of-State Chancellor of Makerere University, a position he served from October 2003 to October 2007.

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