7 girls rescued during Usafi Mosque raid confirmed pregnant

Monday May 07 2018

KAMPALA. Police have confirmed that seven out of 63 girls rescued from kidnap during the Usafi Mosque raid are pregnant.
Deputy police spokesperson, Patrick Onyango told journalists in Kampala on Monday that medical examinations had indicated that seven out 11 girls defiled during captivity were at different stages of pregnancy.

“The medical experts have carried out examination on them and found some to be very sick and these are currently receiving treatment at medical centres. Seven girls were found to be at various stages of pregnancy. Sadly, these girls aged 13 to 15 years were defiled and it was confirmed by the examination,” Mr Onyango said.

Related stories

  • How police under Gen Kayihura ignored warning on Usafi Mosque

    Sunday April 29 2018


    Kampala. A day after a security raid on Usafi Mosque in Kampala, details are starting to emerge of how children were being held captive and radicalised at the place of worship.
    The raid on the mosque near Kisenyi, a city suburb, on Friday night left two suspects dead and 36 arrested, according police. Eighteen women and 94 children were rescued.
    Rahama Nantumbwe reveals how her husband, Abubaker Senono, has been missing for close to four months now ever since he joined the group of Muslims praying from the mosque.

    READ:

    Inside community of Kampala ‘terrorists’

    Saturday April 28 2018

    home03pix

    The secluded community in Mengo, Kampala, which was stormed by a joint force of army and police on Friday night had been a source of suspicion from neighbours for years, Sunday Monitor has established.

    The police said yesterday that during the operation that started at about 9pm, two people in the compound were killed. Internal Affairs minister Jeje Odongo told a press conference at the Uganda Media Centre that one member of the security services was “fatally injured” in the raid. A number of residents we spoke to at the scene, however, claimed that more than 10 bodies were removed from the scene.

    A number of residents in Kiguli Village, Kisenyi III Parish, who we talked to had queer information to share about the community, which lived in an enclosure made of iron sheets, living in temporary structures also largely made out of iron sheets and timber.

    The community, which subscribes to Shia Islam, had a mosque, which was largely closed to the members of the neighbouring community, with the few outsiders, who sought to access the area having to first undergo thorough checking.

    The community also had a mosque of their own and their preaching, projected on a megaphone, would often be overheard by members of the neighbouring community.

    In their preaching, residents told Sunday Monitor, the community spiritual leaders were critical of President Museveni and the Kabaka of Buganda among other public figures. The neighbours say the Kabaka was criticised for being “worshiped”.

    The community also had a tailor, the neighbours say, who would be called upon to clip the trousers of men, who visited them and their trousers were deemed too long for the community’s liking.

    There was also a health centre and the children within the enclosed community were educated from within, the neighbours say, completing the image of a largely self-sufficient community that worked to minimise its contact with the outside world.

    On designated days when the members of the community felt the need to express love to their partners, community members told Sunday Monitor, men would take their wives to neighbouring shops, buy them drinks and then carry them on their backs as they disappeared back into the enclosure. The community member who narrated this to us could not hold back laughter.

    Leadership
    The members of the neighbouring community told this newspaper that they heard of the arrest of one Abdulrahman, perhaps at Entebbe Airport, the man who they had seen in the community and led the secluded community.

    After Abdulrahman was arrested by the police, members of the neighbouring community say, another unidentified man took charge of the group. The new leader of the community, neighbours say, died recently and was buried before the attack on the community.

    The operation
    Questions will be asked why security officers took long to act even as residents claim they notified the police and other security personnel about the activities of the group and the threats to the community.

    Neighbours say they first heard three gunshots at around 9pm after the army and police invaded the area. An eyewitness told Sunday Monitor that inside the compound, there were people armed with machetes that took on the security forces.

    “They had a ‘commando’ with machetes, who cut many of the policemen and must have killed at least three. That man [commando] was gunned down after he slit a policeman’s face with a machete,” a man who claimed to have been within watching distance of the encounter told, Sunday Monitor.

    Police continuously dispersed tear gas into the neighbouring settlements to prevent people from coming closer or even watching what happened.

    At least three neighbours doubted the number of deaths that the police have released (two “terrorists” and one policeman).

    “The number of Muslims killed could be anywhere between nine and 20,” one observer told Sunday Monitor.

    Police explain attack

    In a hastily arranged press conference yesterday morning, the police said two of the people in the compound were killed, 36 individuals were arrested from the compound, 94 children were “rescued”, just like 18 women.
    Mr Abbas Byakagaba, the director of counter terrorism in the police, said the suspect was linked to the kidnap and murder of Susan Magara earlier this year.

    “I hope you are all aware that Susan Magara was killed and the security forces have been following,” Mr Byakagaba said.

    “There was a key suspect, who was being followed and that suspect went to Usafi Market and that time we were only following that suspect. But in the process we found children whom we believe were kidnapped. In the process there was an engagement that resulted in the death of the two and serious injury to one of our own.”

    The suspect they were pursuing, a statement signed by police spokesperson Emilian Kayima said, is linked to the kidnap and murder and murder of Susan Magara earlier this month.

    “Following credible intelligence, one of the key suspects whose name we shall not reveal now to protect the investigations in the murder of the late Susa Magara ran to Usafi mosque in Kisenyi having known that he was being tracked by the security agencies,” the statement reads in part.
    The police further claimed that weapons - 60 rounds of 6.7mm ammunition, bows and arrows, and machetes – were recovered from the compound.

    Asked why the security forces stormed a compound with vulnerable people, Mr Kayima said: “We did not anticipate that we would find children and women, but the operation unveiled a lot. We will take statements from the 36 suspects arrested and will ascertain what is there.”

    Franklin Draku & Derrick Wandera contributed to this story

    [email protected]

    Senono went missing from his home in Kweba Zone, Mutundwe, Kampala, after handing over his daughter, Adillah Nakijoba, 14, and his niece, Jamillah Nampeera, 13, to this group of Tabliqs.
    “He (Senono) left home on December 26, 2017. Before he left, I tried to inquire from him where he was going and he told me he did not know. When we were still talking, his phone rang and the name on the screen was reading Abdullahaman. When he picked up the phone, he was immediately called to the mosque at Sekaziga House,” Nantumbwe narrates.

    Mosque leader
    Abdullahaman is the head of the sect, which is believed to be associated with Jamil Mukulu. At Usafi Mosque, he is called Abdullahaman while at Sekaziga House Mosque, he is known as Hassan Musa.
    However, she later received a phone call from the same Abdullahaman, telling her how Senono had been arrested and asking her to send him Shs1m so that he could smuggle him in a container. Nantumbwe says she refused to send him the money after he (Abdullahaman) failed to tell her the circumstances of Senono’s arrest or where he was being held.
    She says since then, she has never heard from him. Nantumbwe says when she called Senono’s mother, she directed her to Usafi Mosque, commonly referred as Malikazi.

    Nantumbwe says when they went to the place, they were denied a chance to speak to the children until one elderly man convinced them to let her in.
    She said it took a lot of pleading before they could be allowed access to the children. Although she saw the children, they were not allowed to speak to them.
    “The children were being mistreated, they were eating one meal a day and they all looked frail,” she says. She says when they looked at the blackboard, they saw the children being taught about the direction to Congo.

    This prompted Nantumbwe to report a case of disappearance of Senono, Nakijoba and Nampeera at Mutundwe Police Post on January 19. The police post referred her to Old Kampala Police Station, who also claimed they did not handle matters of religion.
    By Saturday evening, Nantumbwe did not know the whereabouts of the two girls following the raid.
    A resident of Luzige Zone where the mosque is located, described the group as very complicated.

    “Sometimes you can hear people crying and being beaten. If you go to that mosque to pray, you must explain what has brought you in that mosque or else you are branded a spy and that comes with a number of kibokos (canes),” the resident, who declined to be identified, revealed.
    Following the weekend raid, the place is still being guarded by anti-terrorism police.
    “We do not know and we can never know how many people died during that operation. But that number of two is not true. It was a real battle, those guys inside had guns; at least 20 people died during the shootout,” one resident said.

    During an investigation in February, Daily Monitor established that Nakijoba and Nampeera were living in the mosque. At the time, there were about 18 children. This newspaper could not reach Mualim Mahad who has been teaching the children at the mosque.
    One security operative, who declined to be named, blamed the mess at the mosque on former Inspector General of Police Kale Kayihura, whom he said ordered police to arrest the group before reversing the order.

    Ignored intelligence
    “We always had information that the group was radicalising children. One day, Kayihura told us to arrest [the suspects] at 11am; we arrested and he told us to release [and] we released [them]. At 2pm of the same day, he told us to arrest them and shortly after, he ordered us to release them, which we did. At 7pm, he again told us to arrest them but that time the boys refused to execute the arrest,” says the officer.
    We were unable to reach Gen Kayihura to confirm this version of events.
    A senior police officer, who was closely associated with the operation, said the former police chief was at the time likely being misled by rival Muslim groups.

    Daily Monitor has learnt that the group’s Amir, Abdullahaman Faisan, had not been seen at the place in the last two months. It was reported that he had committed suicide but we could not independently verify this. Meanwhile, the owner of the place, Shiekh Ibrahim Kimera, died of hypertension and was buried on Friday at Nkoowe on Hoima Road.

    [email protected]

  • Opposition tasks govt on murder of Muslim clerics report

    Thursday May 03 2018


    Kampala.

    Opposition Justice Forum Party (JEEMA) has asked government to produce a report on the murder and arrests of Muslim clerics across the county.
    Mr Hussein Kyanjo, the former Secretary General of the party, while addressing the media yesterday, said many Muslim clerics have spent years on remand without appearing before court and yet there is no report incriminating them.
    “Our laws grant suspects the right to have legal representation as well as the right to be visited by their family members, however if the suspect is a Muslim it can take almost forever to see your lawyer or even a relative,” Mr Kyanjo said.
    His comments come after the police last week raided a mosque near Usafi Market, killing two suspects and arresting 36 others. The police also said they rescued 94 children and 18 women who had been held hostage.
    Mr Kyanjo said: “The laws are clear on the right for bail but for the Muslims, different sets of laws seem to be applied. He said they are denied the right to bail and when they manage to secure one, they are immediately rearrested and fresh charges slapped against them.
    He said all the Muslims are now demanding that the government investigates these cases against them and make the report public.

    State behind
    He added that their investigations of the same cases show that the state is behind many of the events and offers heavy financial incentives to those involved in the act.
    On the Usafi mosque raid, Kyanjo said, they want the authority to follow the proper procedure of investigation and produce a report not to tell lies that they were there for many years and they did nothing.
    “We shall only be sure when the investigations are done and the report is out, the trick is that if we all keep silent and say may be they are criminals it will happen again to another Muslim section, that is why we are concerned,” Mr Kyanjo said.
    Last year, police raided Nakasero mosque and arrested 11 Muslims over acts of criminality. During the same month another mosque in Kiwatule was raided and 13 more Muslims, including eight Indian missionaries, were arrested but later, they were released with police saying they had no case to answer.

  • Inside community of Kampala ‘terrorists’

    Saturday April 28 2018

    home03pix

    The secluded community in Mengo, Kampala, which was stormed by a joint force of army and police on Friday night had been a source of suspicion from neighbours for years, Sunday Monitor has established.

    The police said yesterday that during the operation that started at about 9pm, two people in the compound were killed. Internal Affairs minister Jeje Odongo told a press conference at the Uganda Media Centre that one member of the security services was “fatally injured” in the raid. A number of residents we spoke to at the scene, however, claimed that more than 10 bodies were removed from the scene.

    A number of residents in Kiguli Village, Kisenyi III Parish, who we talked to had queer information to share about the community, which lived in an enclosure made of iron sheets, living in temporary structures also largely made out of iron sheets and timber.

    The community, which subscribes to Shia Islam, had a mosque, which was largely closed to the members of the neighbouring community, with the few outsiders, who sought to access the area having to first undergo thorough checking.

    The community also had a mosque of their own and their preaching, projected on a megaphone, would often be overheard by members of the neighbouring community.

    In their preaching, residents told Sunday Monitor, the community spiritual leaders were critical of President Museveni and the Kabaka of Buganda among other public figures. The neighbours say the Kabaka was criticised for being “worshiped”.

    The community also had a tailor, the neighbours say, who would be called upon to clip the trousers of men, who visited them and their trousers were deemed too long for the community’s liking.

    There was also a health centre and the children within the enclosed community were educated from within, the neighbours say, completing the image of a largely self-sufficient community that worked to minimise its contact with the outside world.

    On designated days when the members of the community felt the need to express love to their partners, community members told Sunday Monitor, men would take their wives to neighbouring shops, buy them drinks and then carry them on their backs as they disappeared back into the enclosure. The community member who narrated this to us could not hold back laughter.

    Leadership
    The members of the neighbouring community told this newspaper that they heard of the arrest of one Abdulrahman, perhaps at Entebbe Airport, the man who they had seen in the community and led the secluded community.

    After Abdulrahman was arrested by the police, members of the neighbouring community say, another unidentified man took charge of the group. The new leader of the community, neighbours say, died recently and was buried before the attack on the community.

    The operation
    Questions will be asked why security officers took long to act even as residents claim they notified the police and other security personnel about the activities of the group and the threats to the community.

    Neighbours say they first heard three gunshots at around 9pm after the army and police invaded the area. An eyewitness told Sunday Monitor that inside the compound, there were people armed with machetes that took on the security forces.

    “They had a ‘commando’ with machetes, who cut many of the policemen and must have killed at least three. That man [commando] was gunned down after he slit a policeman’s face with a machete,” a man who claimed to have been within watching distance of the encounter told, Sunday Monitor.

    Police continuously dispersed tear gas into the neighbouring settlements to prevent people from coming closer or even watching what happened.

    At least three neighbours doubted the number of deaths that the police have released (two “terrorists” and one policeman).

    “The number of Muslims killed could be anywhere between nine and 20,” one observer told Sunday Monitor.

    Police explain attack

    In a hastily arranged press conference yesterday morning, the police said two of the people in the compound were killed, 36 individuals were arrested from the compound, 94 children were “rescued”, just like 18 women.
    Mr Abbas Byakagaba, the director of counter terrorism in the police, said the suspect was linked to the kidnap and murder of Susan Magara earlier this year.

    “I hope you are all aware that Susan Magara was killed and the security forces have been following,” Mr Byakagaba said.

    “There was a key suspect, who was being followed and that suspect went to Usafi Market and that time we were only following that suspect. But in the process we found children whom we believe were kidnapped. In the process there was an engagement that resulted in the death of the two and serious injury to one of our own.”

    The suspect they were pursuing, a statement signed by police spokesperson Emilian Kayima said, is linked to the kidnap and murder and murder of Susan Magara earlier this month.

    “Following credible intelligence, one of the key suspects whose name we shall not reveal now to protect the investigations in the murder of the late Susa Magara ran to Usafi mosque in Kisenyi having known that he was being tracked by the security agencies,” the statement reads in part.
    The police further claimed that weapons - 60 rounds of 6.7mm ammunition, bows and arrows, and machetes – were recovered from the compound.

    Asked why the security forces stormed a compound with vulnerable people, Mr Kayima said: “We did not anticipate that we would find children and women, but the operation unveiled a lot. We will take statements from the 36 suspects arrested and will ascertain what is there.”

    Franklin Draku & Derrick Wandera contributed to this story

    [email protected]

  • Two suspected terrorists shot dead in Kampala

    Saturday April 28 2018


    KAMPALA.

    The Uganda Police Force in a joint operation with sister security agencies has early this morning conducted an operation at Usafi mosque in Kisenyi and other locations in and around Kampala, shooting dead two suspected terrorists.

    Emilian Kayima, the police spokesperson in a brief statement said that "a sizeable number of suspects involved in acts of terrorism and radicalization were arrested."

    He added that women and children who had been held hostage were successfully rescued.

    "In the operation, two of the armed suspects were shot dead as they attacked the officers in the operation," said.

    Mosque raids

    Last year, police raided Nakasero mosque and arrested 11 Muslims over acts of criminality. During the same month another mosque in Kiwatule was raided and 13 more Muslims including eight Indian missionaries were arrested but later, they were released with police saying they had acted on false intelligence.

    RELATED: Police apologise over mosque raids

  • Usafi mosque: One family's struggle to rescue their children

    Monday April 30 2018

    latest007 pix

    A family, whose two children were part of the children held hostage at Usafi Mosque, has narrated how they struggled to retrieve the minors in vain. The children are 12-year-old Adillah Nakijoba and 13-year-old, Jamillah Nampeela, both residents of Mutundwe, a Kampala suburb.
    Their grandmother, Ms Afusa Namujuzi explains that the children disappeared together with their father, Abubaker Ssenono on December 29, 2017.
    According to Ms Namujuzi, she filed a case of missing persons at Mutundwe Police Station under reference number SD14/19/01/2018.

    READ:

    How police under Gen Kayihura ignored warning on Usafi Mosque

    Sunday April 29 2018


    Kampala. A day after a security raid on Usafi Mosque in Kampala, details are starting to emerge of how children were being held captive and radicalised at the place of worship.
    The raid on the mosque near Kisenyi, a city suburb, on Friday night left two suspects dead and 36 arrested, according police. Eighteen women and 94 children were rescued.
    Rahama Nantumbwe reveals how her husband, Abubaker Senono, has been missing for close to four months now ever since he joined the group of Muslims praying from the mosque.

    READ:

    Inside community of Kampala ‘terrorists’

    Saturday April 28 2018

    home03pix

    The secluded community in Mengo, Kampala, which was stormed by a joint force of army and police on Friday night had been a source of suspicion from neighbours for years, Sunday Monitor has established.

    The police said yesterday that during the operation that started at about 9pm, two people in the compound were killed. Internal Affairs minister Jeje Odongo told a press conference at the Uganda Media Centre that one member of the security services was “fatally injured” in the raid. A number of residents we spoke to at the scene, however, claimed that more than 10 bodies were removed from the scene.

    A number of residents in Kiguli Village, Kisenyi III Parish, who we talked to had queer information to share about the community, which lived in an enclosure made of iron sheets, living in temporary structures also largely made out of iron sheets and timber.

    The community, which subscribes to Shia Islam, had a mosque, which was largely closed to the members of the neighbouring community, with the few outsiders, who sought to access the area having to first undergo thorough checking.

    The community also had a mosque of their own and their preaching, projected on a megaphone, would often be overheard by members of the neighbouring community.

    In their preaching, residents told Sunday Monitor, the community spiritual leaders were critical of President Museveni and the Kabaka of Buganda among other public figures. The neighbours say the Kabaka was criticised for being “worshiped”.

    The community also had a tailor, the neighbours say, who would be called upon to clip the trousers of men, who visited them and their trousers were deemed too long for the community’s liking.

    There was also a health centre and the children within the enclosed community were educated from within, the neighbours say, completing the image of a largely self-sufficient community that worked to minimise its contact with the outside world.

    On designated days when the members of the community felt the need to express love to their partners, community members told Sunday Monitor, men would take their wives to neighbouring shops, buy them drinks and then carry them on their backs as they disappeared back into the enclosure. The community member who narrated this to us could not hold back laughter.

    Leadership
    The members of the neighbouring community told this newspaper that they heard of the arrest of one Abdulrahman, perhaps at Entebbe Airport, the man who they had seen in the community and led the secluded community.

    After Abdulrahman was arrested by the police, members of the neighbouring community say, another unidentified man took charge of the group. The new leader of the community, neighbours say, died recently and was buried before the attack on the community.

    The operation
    Questions will be asked why security officers took long to act even as residents claim they notified the police and other security personnel about the activities of the group and the threats to the community.

    Neighbours say they first heard three gunshots at around 9pm after the army and police invaded the area. An eyewitness told Sunday Monitor that inside the compound, there were people armed with machetes that took on the security forces.

    “They had a ‘commando’ with machetes, who cut many of the policemen and must have killed at least three. That man [commando] was gunned down after he slit a policeman’s face with a machete,” a man who claimed to have been within watching distance of the encounter told, Sunday Monitor.

    Police continuously dispersed tear gas into the neighbouring settlements to prevent people from coming closer or even watching what happened.

    At least three neighbours doubted the number of deaths that the police have released (two “terrorists” and one policeman).

    “The number of Muslims killed could be anywhere between nine and 20,” one observer told Sunday Monitor.

    Police explain attack

    In a hastily arranged press conference yesterday morning, the police said two of the people in the compound were killed, 36 individuals were arrested from the compound, 94 children were “rescued”, just like 18 women.
    Mr Abbas Byakagaba, the director of counter terrorism in the police, said the suspect was linked to the kidnap and murder of Susan Magara earlier this year.

    “I hope you are all aware that Susan Magara was killed and the security forces have been following,” Mr Byakagaba said.

    “There was a key suspect, who was being followed and that suspect went to Usafi Market and that time we were only following that suspect. But in the process we found children whom we believe were kidnapped. In the process there was an engagement that resulted in the death of the two and serious injury to one of our own.”

    The suspect they were pursuing, a statement signed by police spokesperson Emilian Kayima said, is linked to the kidnap and murder and murder of Susan Magara earlier this month.

    “Following credible intelligence, one of the key suspects whose name we shall not reveal now to protect the investigations in the murder of the late Susa Magara ran to Usafi mosque in Kisenyi having known that he was being tracked by the security agencies,” the statement reads in part.
    The police further claimed that weapons - 60 rounds of 6.7mm ammunition, bows and arrows, and machetes – were recovered from the compound.

    Asked why the security forces stormed a compound with vulnerable people, Mr Kayima said: “We did not anticipate that we would find children and women, but the operation unveiled a lot. We will take statements from the 36 suspects arrested and will ascertain what is there.”

    Franklin Draku & Derrick Wandera contributed to this story

    [email protected]

    Senono went missing from his home in Kweba Zone, Mutundwe, Kampala, after handing over his daughter, Adillah Nakijoba, 14, and his niece, Jamillah Nampeera, 13, to this group of Tabliqs.
    “He (Senono) left home on December 26, 2017. Before he left, I tried to inquire from him where he was going and he told me he did not know. When we were still talking, his phone rang and the name on the screen was reading Abdullahaman. When he picked up the phone, he was immediately called to the mosque at Sekaziga House,” Nantumbwe narrates.

    Mosque leader
    Abdullahaman is the head of the sect, which is believed to be associated with Jamil Mukulu. At Usafi Mosque, he is called Abdullahaman while at Sekaziga House Mosque, he is known as Hassan Musa.
    However, she later received a phone call from the same Abdullahaman, telling her how Senono had been arrested and asking her to send him Shs1m so that he could smuggle him in a container. Nantumbwe says she refused to send him the money after he (Abdullahaman) failed to tell her the circumstances of Senono’s arrest or where he was being held.
    She says since then, she has never heard from him. Nantumbwe says when she called Senono’s mother, she directed her to Usafi Mosque, commonly referred as Malikazi.

    Nantumbwe says when they went to the place, they were denied a chance to speak to the children until one elderly man convinced them to let her in.
    She said it took a lot of pleading before they could be allowed access to the children. Although she saw the children, they were not allowed to speak to them.
    “The children were being mistreated, they were eating one meal a day and they all looked frail,” she says. She says when they looked at the blackboard, they saw the children being taught about the direction to Congo.

    This prompted Nantumbwe to report a case of disappearance of Senono, Nakijoba and Nampeera at Mutundwe Police Post on January 19. The police post referred her to Old Kampala Police Station, who also claimed they did not handle matters of religion.
    By Saturday evening, Nantumbwe did not know the whereabouts of the two girls following the raid.
    A resident of Luzige Zone where the mosque is located, described the group as very complicated.

    “Sometimes you can hear people crying and being beaten. If you go to that mosque to pray, you must explain what has brought you in that mosque or else you are branded a spy and that comes with a number of kibokos (canes),” the resident, who declined to be identified, revealed.
    Following the weekend raid, the place is still being guarded by anti-terrorism police.
    “We do not know and we can never know how many people died during that operation. But that number of two is not true. It was a real battle, those guys inside had guns; at least 20 people died during the shootout,” one resident said.

    During an investigation in February, Daily Monitor established that Nakijoba and Nampeera were living in the mosque. At the time, there were about 18 children. This newspaper could not reach Mualim Mahad who has been teaching the children at the mosque.
    One security operative, who declined to be named, blamed the mess at the mosque on former Inspector General of Police Kale Kayihura, whom he said ordered police to arrest the group before reversing the order.

    Ignored intelligence
    “We always had information that the group was radicalising children. One day, Kayihura told us to arrest [the suspects] at 11am; we arrested and he told us to release [and] we released [them]. At 2pm of the same day, he told us to arrest them and shortly after, he ordered us to release them, which we did. At 7pm, he again told us to arrest them but that time the boys refused to execute the arrest,” says the officer.
    We were unable to reach Gen Kayihura to confirm this version of events.
    A senior police officer, who was closely associated with the operation, said the former police chief was at the time likely being misled by rival Muslim groups.

    Daily Monitor has learnt that the group’s Amir, Abdullahaman Faisan, had not been seen at the place in the last two months. It was reported that he had committed suicide but we could not independently verify this. Meanwhile, the owner of the place, Shiekh Ibrahim Kimera, died of hypertension and was buried on Friday at Nkoowe on Hoima Road.

    [email protected]

    ALSO READ:

    Two suspected terrorists shot dead in Kampala

    Saturday April 28 2018


    KAMPALA.

    The Uganda Police Force in a joint operation with sister security agencies has early this morning conducted an operation at Usafi mosque in Kisenyi and other locations in and around Kampala, shooting dead two suspected terrorists.

    Emilian Kayima, the police spokesperson in a brief statement said that "a sizeable number of suspects involved in acts of terrorism and radicalization were arrested."

    He added that women and children who had been held hostage were successfully rescued.

    "In the operation, two of the armed suspects were shot dead as they attacked the officers in the operation," said.

    Mosque raids

    Last year, police raided Nakasero mosque and arrested 11 Muslims over acts of criminality. During the same month another mosque in Kiwatule was raided and 13 more Muslims including eight Indian missionaries were arrested but later, they were released with police saying they had acted on false intelligence.

    RELATED: Police apologise over mosque raids


    She explains that ten months prior to Ssenono's disappearance with the children, he severed communication with members of his family. Namujuzi explains that Ssenono also ordered his wives Rahma Nantumbwe and the late Zaituni Nakavuma to start praying at a mosque on Sekaziga building in Kampala.
    He reportedly directed them to stop working, saying Allah will provide for them their needs provided they stayed at Sekaziga mosque. According to Namujuzi, Ssenono handed his omnibus taxi to his brother on grounds that his faith couldn't tolerate people who earn their survival through work.
    She explains that although the group was based at Usafi, one has to go through Sekaziga mosque for training before they are transferred to Usafi. Namujuzi notes that his son, Ssenono once told him that he will never die in Uganda, which is full of pagans.
    She explains that they continued tracing for the whereabouts of the children. Namujuzi says they received information that prior to his disappearance, Ssenono left a phone contact to one of their relatives in Rakai District. It is through her that they were able to trace the whereabouts of the children.
    She explains that they went to Usafi mosque and demanded to speak to Mwalimu Mahad alias Abdulahaman but they were turned away, saying he wasn't around. She however, says they were able to meet Mwalimu Mahad later who told them that there was no cause for alarm since the children were studying at the mosque.
    Namujuzi says they were able to speak to the children directly, but they looked scared, saying they were not allowed to tell them anything or any other person for that matter. She however, says one of the children told her they were suffering but couldn't find their way out of the place.
    Muswalid Mutesasira, an uncle to the children, says when they established the location of the children, they reported the matter at Old Kampala Police Station for help. However, the Officer in Charge of Criminal Investigations at Old Kampala Police Station reportedly advised them to return to Mutundwe Police Station where they had earlier reported a case of missing of persons.

    Mutesasira however, says that at Mutundwe an investigative officer whose identity he didn't establish told them they couldn't investigate matters related to religion. He instead referred them to Uganda Muslim Supreme Council (UMSC), which told them it wasn't aware of the said mosque. The family tried to approach some journalists to express their plight, but this didn't help because of the very secretive operations of the group and fear among residents to share information on the group for fear of reprisal.
    Last Saturday, a team of police and UPDF soldiers raided the mosque while pursuing a suspect in the murder of Susan Magara, leading to the rescue of 112 people including children and women. According to Mutesasira, although they haven't received their children, his friend in the Chieftaincy of Military Intelligence (CMI) assured him that their children are amongst those rescued.
    Asked why they haven't been able to pick the children, Mutesasira explained that they have been told that the children are being questioned at Naguru Child Protection Unit, adding that they will be handed over after the process. Mutesasira is hopeful that they will receive the children by Tuesday.

Police said they were looking for the children’s parents so that they can be reunited adding that they are currently under the care and counselling officials from the ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development.
“The number of victims we rescued from captivity now stands at 154 and of these, 28 are women, 63 girls and 63 boys. Their ages range from days to 50+ years. Among the women, three are Burundians who have refused to talk to the investigators,” Mr Onyango said.

Defence and army deputy spokesperson, Lt Col Deo Akiiki, said the Usafi Mosque raid came after investigation into Susan Magara murder indicated it was planned from there adding that currently, the Joint Anti-terrorism Task Team (JATT) was probing among other charges human trafficking, sexual abuse and terrorism.

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