UHRC launches app to report rights abuse

Ruling NRM party supporter Ivan Kamuntu Majambere (right) arrives at Uganda Human Rights Commission headquarters in Kampala where he had gone to ask for help to asylum in the US. PHOTO/ABUBAKER LUBOWA

What you need to know:

  • The report noted that despite legal provisions, the use of torture still exists and that there were allegations of physical and psychological torture, with media reports showing injuries and wounds on the victim’s bodies.

The Uganda Human Rights Commission (UHRC) yesterday launched an online app that citizens will use to lodge their complaints.
The online app dubbed “UHRC APP” targets majorly those in the rural areas who cannot move to their headquarters in Kampala to register complaints.
“This app is a one stop centre that tells you everything about the commission. It is no longer necessary now to travel from Arua or Kabala that you are looking for the UHRC headquarters.
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“The app has a provision for frequently ask questions. People in rural areas will have access to everything they need through this app,” Mr Byonabye Kamadi, the director for research education and documentation at the commission, said yesterday.
Since the app will mainly target those living far from Kampala, concerns have emerged on how people in rural settings will be able to access the Internet and lodge their complaints.
But in response, the State minister for ICT and National Guidance, Mr Godfrey Kabbyanga Baluku, said the government will work on the Internet challenge.
The chairperson of the commission, Ms Mariam Wangadya, said the app will enable citizens to enjoy, defend and claim their rights when violated.  
“It is the real-time for information exchange and engagement; the faster lodging of complaints without having to first travel to offices. 

“The convenience to our clientele, is noteworthy. People with hearing impairments can use the service, which gives us the confidence that our service delivery will improve,” Ms Wangadya said.
Uganda has recorded several cases of human rights abuses, the most recent being that of Mpologoma Majjambere, an NRM supporter, who was allegedly assaulted by members of the National Unity Platform (NUP) party, at the burial ceremony of Suleiman Jakana Nadduli on October 23.
The core mandate of the commission is to protect and promote fundamental human rights and freedoms in Uganda for sustainable development.

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2021 human rights report
 The report noted that despite legal provisions, the use of torture still exists and that there were allegations of physical and psychological torture, with media reports showing injuries and wounds on the victim’s bodies.
 The report further said that the lockdown measures created human rights abuse challenges for access to health care.The report indicated that there were 69 victims of enforced disappearances.

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